Chilling details of a Manitoba teen-terrorist’s support for ISIS were heard in a Brandon courtroom in Canada.

The Muslim terrorist is charged with a terrorism offence. In September, the teen-terrorist pleaded guilty in Winnipeg to a charge of counselling the commission of an indictable offence for the benefit of, at the direction of or in association with a terrorist group.

A news reporter from the CBC contacted RCMP with a tip about a Twitter account indicating a teenager was planning to leave Canada to join ISIS.

Chief Federal Prosecutor for the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, Ian Mahon, outlined what led to the arrest of the teen-terrorist.

Mahon told court the Twitter account provided was later found to belong to the terrorist.

Court heard the account contained messages of support for Hijrah, which involves migration to Syria or Iraq.

A search of the terrorist’s computer resulted in the discovery of terrorist images and propaganda. Mahon described the post in court; “It doesn’t matter how you do it, use a bomb, a knife, a gun or car hashtag ISIS.”

Court heard the teen-terrorist had also been in contact with an ISIS terrorist and that he had searched for the ISIS flag, ISIS video and ISIS messages on the computer.

Court heard further investigation revealed the terrorist did not have a passport, but was looking for guidance on how to move overseas.

Initially, the teen-terrorist denied the Twitter account belonged to him, but later acknowledged to investigators it was his. “He indicated he was planning to leave Canada to fight for the Islamic State,” Mahon told court. “He indicated if he was unable to travel, he would strike from within.”

“He was going to target government buildings, monuments, infrastructure such as electrical grids and federal employees.”

Mahon told court the terrorist indicated he conducted research to do this, and drawings and notebooks were seized by investigators.

“This is all said in a very matter-of-fact tone. Police describe it as a chilling interview.”

The teen-terrorist was 16 years old at the time of the offence and cannot be named due to provisions in the Youth Criminal Justice Act.

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