The Bataclan concert hall turned away two members of Eagles Of Death Metal who were playing during the ISIS attack at the Paris venue last year.

They tried to enter the venue for Sting’s gig as the hall reopened to mark the anniversary of the massacre which killed 90 innocent music fans.

But director Jules Frutos refused to let them in after frontman Jesse Hughes earlier this year suggested that Muslim staff were involved in the gun and suicide bomb attack on November 13, 2015.

‘They came, I threw them out – there are things you can’t forgive,’ Mr Frutos said.

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Former Police frontman Sting, 65, soothed a sell-out crowd with his classic hits as mourners outside lit candles and placed flowers in tribute to those slaughtered by three ISIS gunmen last year.

In the coordinated attacks across Paris, 130 people were left dead and hundreds more injured in the worst terrorist atrocity to hit France.

Sting, who today landed in Paris from New York where he celebrated the release of his latest album 57th & 9th, said he agreed to the gig ‘to remember and honour those who lost their lives’. 

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When he stepped on stage to loud cheers, he delivered his poignant message, speaking French to the packed crowd:  ‘We’ve got two important things to do tonight … First, to remember and honour those who lost their lives in the attacks a year ago, and to celebrate the life and the music of this historic venue.

‘So before we begin, I would like to ask that we observe one minute of silence … We shall not forget them.’

His appearance is a major boost for the venue which had been struggling to attract big names back to perform there since the atrocities during an Eagles of Death Metal gig.

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Islamic terrorist suicide bombers – Frenchmen Omar Ismail Mostefai, 29, Samy Amimour, 28, and Foued Mohamed-Aggad, 23 – stormed into the concert hall as US rock band Eagles Of Death Metal performed, while jihadists also targeted cafes and the Stade de France.

In a show of defiance Jerome Langlet, of the venue’s owners Lagardere Live Entertainment, said: ‘The whole world is going to see the Bataclan live again.’

Since the attacks, the hall’s devastated interior has been completely replaced, from the seats to the floorboards, with identical fittings.

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‘We wanted to change everything so nothing would remain of that terrible night,’ said Langlet, adding that ‘several million euros’ has been spent on refurbishing the building in identical style without losing the venue’s intimate atmosphere. ‘We decide to change everything so nothing would change’.

While reopening the doors will mean reliving painful memories for many, Jules Frutos, who has co-run the venue for the last 12 years, said: ‘We had to go on after such horror and not leave a mausoleum, a tomb.’

Frutos said he rang Sting himself to ask him to play after the British singer said he was keen to help, having played at the Bataclan with The Police in 1979.

‘His coming here is what we needed,’ said Frutos, admitting the weight of the occasion had been too much for many of France’s top performers.

The Bataclan said all 1,000 Sting concert tickets sold out in ‘less than 30 minutes’ and survivors and their families had also been invited to the Saturday night concert.

Sting said: ‘In re-opening the Bataclan, we have two important tasks to reconcile. First, to remember and honour those who lost their lives in the attack a year ago, and second, to celebrate the life and the music that this historic theatre represents.

‘In doing so we hope to respect the memory as well as the life-affirming spirit of those who fell. We shall not forget them.’

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